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Summer Perfection (Part 1) My perfect Bogs

      The following photos are of my dear friends Greg and Marcia’s pond. Rebuilt in the summer of 2004, Greg and Marcia had a preexisting pond and amazing outdoor train hobby collection Greg had maintained since I believe the early 1990s. Longtime pond owners Greg and Marcia had a fairly good idea of what they wanted.

This Bog is just next to the right hand waterfall down from an amazing Deck. Here you see silk stalking arrowheads, iris, creeping jenny, red star ludwigia, and neighboring water lettuce. Note how a good number of plants keep the water clear. Greg and Marcia have not added chemicals to the pond in years just beneficial bacteria and salt about once every spring.

This Bog is just next to the right hand waterfall down from an amazing Deck. Here you see silk stalking arrowheads, iris, creeping jenny, red star ludwigia, and neighboring water lettuce. Note how a good number of plants keep the water clear. Greg and Marcia have not added chemicals to the pond in years just beneficial bacteria and salt about once every spring.

       I consider one of my better pieces of input for clients and myself when I formerly installed water gardens was shallow bog areas I created at certain points along the edge of many ponds I built. Simply pockets along the edge of the line that remained 1-3 inches from the surface. Before filling the pond we would fill each of these pockets with dirt and plant the shelf level plants. The reason? Pots. Who wants to look a pots and containers right at the waters edge. My former ponds normally had one large bog that would go often along the backside of the pond and be a wonderful environment for lotus and taller plants. This pond however was in the middle of the back yard and extended to one small hillside. A long bog taking up the entirety of the pond would have created a block to the rest of the yard, so we incorporated 4 smaller pockets around the edges of the pond.  Two at the base and two on either side of what is now a double waterfall. Each pocket held about one wheel barrow full of dirt, topsoil and clay. After digging a 22 x 13 foot pond there is normally an excess of soil you can use. Since you fill the pod up after adding the dirt and planting the plants the pockets generally release no dirt or very little into the pond itself. Each year since I have planted different plants in Greg and Marcia’s four bog areas. Some plants are perennials and always come back like silk stalkings, obedient flowers, pickerel rush, and creeping jenny and some plants I chose different each year.

zoomed out bog with Dwarf Giant Papyurs, Society Fowers and Taro Plumbae,

zoomed out bog with Dwarf Giant Papyurs, Society Fowers and Taro Plumbae,

Each bog acts as a sort of container garden with a variety of selections. This year has been my favorite. In two bogs I planted Red star ludwigia, normally thought of as an underwater submerged plant similar to things like anacharis in the bottom of a pond or fish tank. On my visit to Florida Aquatic Nurseries last summer I thought it highly interesting that many plants you find in pond shops and pet stores as underwater plants are grown in facilities above the water. They can grow in both and are more easily propagated as a kind of bog plant, trimmed, rubber-banded, and then submersed. In the following photo you can see the Red Star Ludwigia (Ludwigia glandulosa) is a striking contrast to the green creeping jenny and looks amazing as a bog plant. Red Star Ludwigia, to the left of the word Ohio. Unseen are dwarf giant papyrus and variegated society flower.

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More photos of Greg & Marcia’s pond in full view on an upcoming post and the two waterfalls. 

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Comments

  1. Beverley says:

    I have some red star ludwigia from earlier this year. Can I pull it up from the bottom and grow it as a bog like you did or would it be too late?

    Beverley Conrad

  2. admin says:

    Hi Beverley,
    Yes you can still bring it to the surface. Give it a few days to adjust and the leaves stand out of the water. -Zac

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