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Aquatic Lingo “true aquatic”

Aquatic Lingo “true aquatic”

A question yesterday from Cathy of Houston Texas as to what a true aquatic was. As stated by the IWGS, “True aquatics grow either underwater – submersed, or partly underwater – emersed.” This would make of course waterlilies true aquatics, and you may think of submerged oxygenators as true aquatics, but not all (even some […]

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Summer Perfection (Part 1) My perfect Bogs

      The following photos are of my dear friends Greg and Marcia’s pond. Rebuilt in the summer of 2004, Greg and Marcia had a preexisting pond and amazing outdoor train hobby collection Greg had maintained since I believe the early 1990s. Longtime pond owners Greg and Marcia had a fairly good idea of what they […]

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2010 Aquatic Plants!

What I mean to say is I want to know over the next 6 weeks or so what additional species you would like to see from our nurseries. We offer more aquatic species than any other retail supplier in the world thanks to our superior Florida growers who are constantly creating new impressive species but […]

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2 Important Resources a water gardener should have. . .

2 Important Resources a water gardener should have. . .

     There are several excellent  books we use for resource information, two of the books we highly recommend are Encyclopedia of Water Gardensby Greg Speichert and Sue Speichert  and the other book is Waterlilies and Lotuses by Perry D. Slocum.  We hope you can curl up in a chair or hammock beside your pond or […]

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Moneywort (Bacopa monnieri) New 2009

Though only new for the company I work for, I have been familiar with moneywort for some time. It is easy to grow and can be planted as an oxygenator under the water or a flowering bog plant. This plant can actually be grown as an herb apparently benefiting the brain. I am not growing it for that purpose so that’s as deep as I will go into that use. As a submerged pond plant it is very easy to grow and enjoys light. This plant will probably rot and die in shady ponds.

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Red Star Ludwigia (Ludwigia glandulosa) NEW 2009!

Of the four new submerged oxygenating pond plants we are introducing to the homeowners of water gardens in 2009 this I think will be my favorite. A fan of Ludwigia repens for years this new market variety is bright red and grows from below the waters surface to above. The foliage is absolutly fantastic, a deep wine red in color bings something new and amazing to the surface of the pond.

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NEW! Lemon Bacopa (Bacopa Caroliniana)

New for 2009, Lemon Bacopa, with a fun name and a very interesting pond plant. This plant comes bunched like anacharis but grows up to the surface of the water and then slightly above. Not only that but once above the surface it begins to bloom with tiny wondrous blue flowers. This plant can also be planted as a bog plant and will love the soil and bloom more often. A great oxygenator I hope we can keep this in stock for 2009.

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Vallisneria, Jungle Vallisneria (Vallisneria Americana).. not sea weed

This plant will remind you of what you think of sea weed perhaps. It is an freshwater submerged pond plant. One of the few submerged oxygenating pond plants that does not come banded and bunched as each is an individual plant. It begins with a root and almost bulb underneath the stem, the leaves grow tall toward the surface. You can still use lead weights on the vallisneria to anchor each plant. Fish like the plant to hide around and most of them will leave the plant alone. It may not be as easy for baby fish to hide in as hornwort or anacharis but its a great plant and looks great under the water. It will overwinter in the bottom of ponds.

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Cabomba, perhaps my least favorite submerged pond plant!

Cabomba furcata and Cabomba caroliniana are the two most common types I have found sold in the water garden industry. The plant for all intensive purposes belongsstricktly in the aquarium plant industry. Why? Well it is very soft and both the stems and the foliage break easily. Normally harvested and bunched in Florida shipped once is OK, if we ship it to another supplier and then they ship it to you, the plants arrive unhealthy and falling apart. Anacharis and hornwort can be damaged slightly in shipping and come back in a matter of days with new growth. Cabomba simply disintegrates. On top of that problem they are so soft they make excellent meals for fish. One final problem, sold as a bunched plant, the rubber bands often destroy the bottom stems and the plant then float about the pond.

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Anacharis (Egeria densa) Submerged Oxygenating Pond Plants

Anacharis come in small bunches about 6-8 stems rubber banded together. Many on-line companies offer these with optional weights so they sink straight to the bottom and no planting or baskets are required. The weights are a malleable (bendable) heavy metal that you simply wrap around the area where the rubber band is already located at the bottom of the stems. These plants rob the water of excess nutrients rapidly and that is a great thing, they are a super filter and suck up fish waste like it was nothing. The second benefit, a superior hiding place for adult fish and baby fish fry. Baby fry grow up around anacharis and hornwort and stay hidden from larger fish that would eat them. The larger fish hide between anacharis clusters when Hawks, Raccoons, Possums, neighborhood kids with nets, or the big daddy pond nemesis the Heron come around. Having enough submerged grasses and also surface plants (water lettuce, water hyacinths, and water lilies) keep your pond from becoming the daily buffet. Anacharis should be added 1 bunch per 10 gallons of water in ponds under 5000 gallons, or 1 bunch per 20 gallons for ponds over 5000 gallons. Thats many bunches but this product is sold in quantity and is generally a one time investment. If you have enough surface plants in your pond and submerged plants you will never add a drop of chemicals to ward off algae saving you 1000’s of dollars over the years, 100’s per season so just do it right the first time.

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